The surprise on my desk

This post was written while we were in Chad.

I had to go out this morning to run some errands. Deborah sat in the library, so I left the door open, and it must have been open for the rest of the morning.

One of the errands involved our battery charger. It had stopped working; how were we going to recharge all these batteries? I finally decided the cord that was broken should be opened up to see what was the matter. When I did, I realized that two wires soldered back onto the contact would fix the thing. So I brought it to a guy with a soldering iron who knows what he is doing. He easily fixed it… And graciously charged me nothing. And now it works great!

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One step closer to a solar fridge

This post was written while we were in Chad.

Today, the holiday was solidly lingering in town, so things were harder to get. We needed ice for the cooler we used as a fridge in the morning; we keep the green cooler above the ground, so the melting ice is leaked into a bowl for reuse.

the cooler we use for a fridgeI went on to the meat market. There was one man selling goat meat, and another selling beef, but for a very high price even though the quality was questionable. So I decided against it.

I headed back to the house, then stopped by the ATM to get money for diesel for Twila. A soldier, dressed in desert fatigues and dark mirrored sunglasses, his feet on his submachine gun on a stand, guarded the bank, which was open. Then I took another rickshaw to the house, jumped into Twila, and got diesel at the OilLibya station. I picked up bread at the “Boulangerie la Rotative”, and stopped by at the meat restaurant of my friend Ali. But he wasn’t there; he had put his chairs away, and his metal grill was still smoking.

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Our trip to Iriba: CGCOC, chickens and baby birds

Desert Journal: April 21, 2013

CGCOC is still bravely working in AfricaThe trip to Iriba last week was great! As I drove, I found that the Chinese construction company, CGCOC, was surveying the road from Iriba to Bakaouré. They were getting ready to build a paved road to Abéché, drilling wells in preparation for this task. I wish them well (pun intended) as they take on one of the most challenging projects known to man.

I went to Iriba driving Twila (our Speed The Light vehicle), and corresponded my trip with Andrew’s return to Chad. Andrew wanted to begin recording stories in Z so he could learn how the language works. We got up at 4:30 AM on Wednesday, and spent the morning trying to find someone willing to be recorded. We went to three villages: Geme-Ba, Er and Kuba, but, unfortunately, no one agreed to help us record. However, we did meet a lot of people, drank a lot of tea and learned about Z culture.

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