Extra rain and tools to read with

This post was written while we were still in Chad.

We received a lot of rain yesterday, to the point where the roads became flooded! What a wonderful blessing during such a hot time of year! That is absolutely unheard of in this part of the Sahara Desert, at this time of year. The rainy season lasts for only a couple of months, at most; the rest of the year is dry and very hot. There seems to have been an overall increase in rainfall since I started working here in 2003. Is it possible that desertification is cyclical and will start reversing itself? As a result, this dry, desert land would experience a season of prosperity and more crops than in earlier years.

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From life at home to life overseas: your adventure awaits

Male hands crossed for prayer in dark place

This post was written while we were in Chad.

You are a Christian with a vibrant relationship with Christ. You spend regular time studying His Word and with His people in an awesome church.  At the same time, you feel like God is calling you to live “somewhere else”. You’d love to serve Christ overseas… but the idea raising support scares you to death.

However, the traditional way to get overseas isn’t the only way to fulfill the Great Commission. Thanks to the internet, there are many new ways to find or create a job and earn your living. You can go anywhere Christ leads you, using the skills you have acquired, or gaining new ones while overseas.

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Bothersome interruption

This post was written while we were in Chad.

I have been fixing Sarah’s desk from Guéréda, and it is coming along well. The wood glue that Steve Banks terapeak.com swift rivers puzzle no interruptionrecommended is really working well! Now that I’ve finished the 500 piece puzzle of Swift River, this has become my latest puzzle to try to assemble! The result will also serve as a model to show to our carpenter friend in town for the other desks for the girls.

Our first interruption began earlier in the day. While we were having church, I looked out the one-way window in the living room, and saw two boys about 9 years old, wandering through the yard, looking around. So I quietly went out the front door, and started chasing them. They were terrified! they ran into two directions, so I kept pursuing one of them. Up to the road, he ran and hid behind a young man who pleaded with me on his behalf. Of course, as a Christian, I couldn’t severely punish that boy. I just wanted him to never jump over the wall again. I think I got my message across.

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How Much Solar Energy Do You REALLY Need?

This post was written while we were in Chad.

How much of a solar energy system do you need to satisfy the needs of your village home?

The answer depends on a lot of variables, the biggest of which are where you live and what you want to do with it. Some of us live near the equator and want to just run a few lights, while others of us live outside the tropics, yet still want to run a hot tub while they microwave a bag of popcorn as they watch satellite on a large screen TV, while they wait for their clothes to dry.

To run a few lights, all you need is one 70 Ah battery and a 50 to 120 Watt solar panel. I read about someone who was in the latter group, and three arrays with 25 120 Watt solar panels each could not satisfy their need.

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N’Djaména to Moundou in a day

This post was written while we were in Chad.

For the first time in his life, Randy got to ride a moto taxi! We took two of them to the Commissariat de Police to register him.Moundou moto taxi They were what was available nearby, and so it saved us a lot of money. While Randy filled out the paperwork, my friend there hassled me about changing my number without notifying him. We went back to the guest house to get ready for our departure by bus for Moundou. There, we had a bit of difficulty finding a taxi that was passing by where we were standing, so we had to drag our baggage to the corner.

From the time we arrived at the station to the time we were on the road was less than one hour! It was the hottest part of the day, meaning it was hotter to keep the window open. It was like sitting in front of the largest electric heater fan you can imagine!

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