Our return trip to Abeche

This post was written while we were in Chad.

Today was our trip to Abeche, from Mongo! This trip was the result of five months of planning and prayer. We were so glad to make it here at last!

Sharon is still recovering from her illness, and from a busy, big day of preparation yesterday. I started yesterday off by refilling our water supply from the well in the courtyard. This involved throwing a bucket with a roped tied to it down the well. It was difficult for me to get the bucket to tip into the water so it could fill up. I didn’t realize how heavy a bucket full of water is when you are pulling it back up! After many successful attempts, I obtained about 65 gallons of water, and it took me until 11 AM due to my lack of experience. So, that’s why our friends, the Avileses, are so careful with water!

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How to Keep a Chadian Water Cooler Cold

In the desert land of Chad, there is nothing more refreshing than a cold drink of water. But where could you find it at home, in the market or a business where electricity is so scarce? If I were you, I would head straight for the nearest water pot.

The water pot has its origins in ancient Egyptian and Greek societies. But as people began to use electricity for refrigeration, it fell into disuse. Not so in Chad, where clay pot manufacturing is still one of the most successful artisan businesses.

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Withdrawal of resources, unlimited grace

This post was written while we were in Chad.

We are struggling lately with the basics here at the orphanage. I go to the bank a few times on the weekend for a withdrawal our monthly rent from the ATM. However the dispenser is either down or turned off. We have to wait on this issue before we make a withdrawal of money for our regular living expenses. Now we are starting to draw from our savings. It is the beginning of the month, so the typical rush on the bank is happening now.

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Birthday clues and big rivers of greenish-brown water

This post was written while we were in Chad.

To get to church this morning, I took two taxis, one minivan, and waded knee-deep in greenish brown water in five places off and on for one hour. I didn’t actually have to go through all those streams and ponds, but I became lost a few times. Sometimes the water was slimy under me, other times it was sandy and solid.

clue in floodI saw little red dots visible to the naked eye swimming around in there, thousands of them per square foot on the surface, not to mention the millions that must have swum below the surface! A few times, I saw things floating around in the water my legs were in that you only see in toilets. Although black bags are illegal in Chad, my leg became stuck to one such bag for a few paces. I was thankful to a few strangers who lent a hand by showing me the way toward my destination.

IBRA radio has a training session going on now on production; after one week of classes, they are halfway through it. It was great to meet them at church this morning. Pastor’s wife prepared a delicious macaroni with chicken sauce for lunch; after enjoying that, I was on my way back home to celebrate Deborah’s birthday.

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One step closer to a solar fridge

This post was written while we were in Chad.

Today, the holiday was solidly lingering in town, so things were harder to get. We needed ice for the cooler we used as a fridge in the morning; we keep the green cooler above the ground, so the melting ice is leaked into a bowl for reuse.

the cooler we use for a fridgeI went on to the meat market. There was one man selling goat meat, and another selling beef, but for a very high price even though the quality was questionable. So I decided against it.

I headed back to the house, then stopped by the ATM to get money for diesel for Twila. A soldier, dressed in desert fatigues and dark mirrored sunglasses, his feet on his submachine gun on a stand, guarded the bank, which was open. Then I took another rickshaw to the house, jumped into Twila, and got diesel at the OilLibya station. I picked up bread at the “Boulangerie la Rotative”, and stopped by at the meat restaurant of my friend Ali. But he wasn’t there; he had put his chairs away, and his metal grill was still smoking.

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