A missed flight, friends gained, time lost

This post was written while we were still in Chad, Africa.

I missed my flight back to Abéché! I lost track of time, and no one gave me a ride to catch the flight. Oh well, everyone has to miss at least one flight if they are going to live here. I’ll definitely be ready for next time. So I had to ride in a pickup truck and paid a little extra to get a front seat. I ended up sitting in the market for five hours, which was great for friendship building; but it held up my schedule. I had used up the money I had brought with me, and one of my new friends bought me a soda. Never tasted one better!

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A Wild, Exhausting Journey through the Sand

On Saturday, as we traveled back from Iriba, we took a wrong turn, and found ourselves headed to Adré. Mind you, the road wasn’t so bad; however, it was disconcerting to drive 30 miles on a road that led 90 miles away from our destination. We arrived in Adré at 8 PM, and in Abéché at 11:45 PM. When we arrived in Adré, I decided to keep going; we didn’t know where to find a guest house, or if they would even have a place for us.

Without road signs to guide us on the road, we used the GPS that we’ve had for about a decade now, thanks to our friends at Lebanon Assembly of God! Because we knew where we were going, we stayed the course rather than bolt on a country road in panic.

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How to Keep a Chadian Water Cooler Cold

In the desert land of Chad, there is nothing more refreshing than a cold drink of water. But where could you find it at home, in the market or a business where electricity is so scarce? If I were you, I would head straight for the nearest water pot.

The water pot has its origins in ancient Egyptian and Greek societies. But as people began to use electricity for refrigeration, it fell into disuse. Not so in Chad, where clay pot manufacturing is still one of the most successful artisan businesses.

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Too afraid to start up the generator

Troubled by a rebel attack on Abéché, Chad

Enough time has passed by that I can tell you this story about a generator.  It happened during the time when rebels attacked the town of Abéché.  It is the story of a time when I was under intense pressure to back down in my stand for our friend.  Those who sided with me remained silent but many, while few stood against me, but seemed vocal and determined to have it their way.

We were in Abéché, serving with Bakan Assalam.  At the time, Bakan Assalam would help the Aunties and Uncles of orphans by providing medical and nutritional assistance.  As a result, many of these orphans were able to survive despite the harsh conditions of the deserts of Chad.

My role at Bakan Assalam was to develop the language of the village where they had opened their first dispensary in the 1960s. Rebels had just invaded Abéché.  Our team was on edge.

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Extra rain and tools to read with

This post was written while we were still in Chad.

We received a lot of rain yesterday, to the point where the roads became flooded! What a wonderful blessing during such a hot time of year! That is absolutely unheard of in this part of the Sahara Desert, at this time of year. The rainy season lasts for only a couple of months, at most; the rest of the year is dry and very hot. There seems to have been an overall increase in rainfall since I started working here in 2003. Is it possible that desertification is cyclical and will start reversing itself? As a result, this dry, desert land would experience a season of prosperity and more crops than in earlier years.

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